Cruise Ship Life Can Be An Adventure But It's Hard Work As Well
Going to sea has changed radically since the days of “wooden
ships and iron men”. Although sailors no longer climb ratlines to
reduce sail off the Cape of Good Hope in 35 knot winds, going to
sea is not without its hazards. While working the dining room from
morning to night might not expose you to the howling winds of the
roaring forties, it can still leave you wiped out at the end of the day.

The business of carrying passengers on the high seas has come a
long way since the days of coal-burning four stackers of the early
20th century. Cruise ships today routinely exceed 100,000 tons. The
technology of satellite navigation systems, GPS, and reliable
diesels has tamed many of the traditional perils of the sea, or at
least placed greater power in the hands of cruise ship personnel to
manage them.

However, every so often, we are reminded that a ship at sea is
merely a floating steel structure vulnerable to meteorological or
navigational hazards. The cruise ship
Sea Diamond sank on April 6,
2007 after running aground on a reef near Santorini, a group of
volcanic islands in the Aegean Sea, making it evident that ships can
still sink in the twenty first century.

On February 14, 2005, the Spanish cruise ship
Voyager
encountered a storm in the Mediterranean that resulted in
temporary loss of its engines. To view footage of this terrifying event,
click
here. The only thing that makes viewing the ordeal of this
cruise ship bearable is knowing that the ship emerged from the
storm. However, it serves as a sober reminder that the sea is big
and ships are small.












































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Find the link below to view
terrifying footage of a
cruise ship caught in a
storm in the Mediterranean.